Recognizing Heritage: The Politics of Multiculturalism in New Mexico

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How, for example, has blackness been imagined despite a narrative that eliminates Black people, and ultimately blackness, from the historical memory? George Lipsitz argues that the white spatial imaginary is organized to define White space as exclusive of Black people. Imagining White space as superior space has always been predicated upon the removal of Blacks from the spatial environment. Lipsitz states,. A white spatial imaginary based on exclusivity and augmented exchange value forms the foundational logic behind prevailing spatial and social policies in cities and suburbs today.

This imaginary does not emerge simply directly from the embodied identities of people who are white. It is inscribed in the physical contours of the places where we live, work, and play Lipsitz makes a case for how Black people have been segregated from physical spaces in order to preserve the purity of whiteness. However, I want to think about this in relationship to how blackness is imagined in the process of that exclusion.

Rashad Shabazz adds another element for how we might think of the anti-black spatial imagination.

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He suggests that practices of containment have always been part of Black experiences. In his study on antiblack spatial practices in Chicago he notes that, "Surveillance, policing, and containment continues to be the fabric of Black environments" p.

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The question I am concerned with here is, how does this also come into play with environments where Black people have represented what some might regard inconsequential part of the population? An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page.

Heritage Month Guide

If the problem persists, please try again in a little while. Read preview. Lipsitz states, A white spatial imaginary based on exclusivity and augmented exchange value forms the foundational logic behind prevailing spatial and social policies in cities and suburbs today. Guthrie University of Nebraska Press, Read preview Overview. Social scientists have long studied culturally diverse and marginalized populations in complex, stratified societies. We recognize the deep history of migration, both voluntary and enforced, and the role population movements have played in shaping national economies, political cultures, and cultural identities.

Immigrants and refugees face great challenges in adapting to new societies, negotiating diverse identities, and responding to sociopolitical constraints to their societal participation. At the same time, indigenous communities struggle to defend their sovereignty and human rights in complex societies. Globalization has greatly accelerated the external linkages impacting both indigenous communities and population movements. Traditional views of citizenship have placed greatest weight on formal membership through birth or naturalization that grants individual rights and the ability to participate in the political process.

Historically, national governments adopted different policies toward ethnic minorities, including both indigenous peoples and immigrants. Populist and nationalistic political movements may change these policies. Anthropologists are uniquely situated to examine cultural citizenship as a social process, one where different groups may be included or excluded.

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Can indigenous and aboriginal communities effectively defend cultural interests while negotiating citizen rights within a larger society? What challenges do host communities face in accommodating immigrants? Are so-called minorities, whether defined by race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, or other cultural markers, afforded full cultural citizenship?


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